ASOS Breaking Up With Paper Email | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on February 26, 2020

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I have blogged about ASOS before, where I really loved the content within their product descriptions. I am so happy to be back again to talk about this excellent email that I just received from them.

Let’s take a look.

How cute is this email!?

I also love that this email came into my inbox on the day my latest order is arriving. This adds another level of excellence to this email—forethought! If this messaging had been hidden in the original order confirmation, it is incredibly unlikely that I would have seen it. The subject line for this was “Missing something from your ASOS order?” which is also a strong choice, because I opened it immediately, expecting that they were going to tell me that something had not been shipped. I was pleasantly surprised to find this friendly email with a positive, Earth-friendly update. As a company that uses multiple forms of transportation to move product, I appreciate that reducing their footprint cannot be easy, and any efforts are valuable.

In addition, I know that ASOS has the data on the return rate that comes along with their customer orders. I’m sure there is an expected balance between savings on paper and printer ink and perhaps additional customer service time for any shoppers who struggle with the return process becoming more customer-driven.

All in all, a winning move by ASOS, combined with an impressive communication strategy.

——

The only thing I do take issue with is the math. (If you aren’t interested in nitpicky stuff, you can move on. All of the marketing stuff is over.)

According to the encyclopedia, the biggest measured blue whale came in at approximately 200,000 pounds. (A blue whale is a baleen whale so the image above could represent a blue whale.)

320,000 kg = 705,479 pounds, so I’m guessing that we are talking about a currently-unconfirmed GIANT blue whale?

Please note that the average weight of either an Asian or African elephant fits into the appropriate range for ASOS’ math, so I don’t take issue with not identifying the specific type of elephant.

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