brand experience

Spotify Election Playlist | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on October 31, 2018

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I’m back today with another quick post – an excellent promotion of our upcoming election by Spotify.

Here’s a link to the playlist on Spotify.

I really enjoy this idea. I appreciate any and all efforts to encourage people to vote, and this mention by Spotify that I received on my phone isn’t at all telling me which way to vote, but encouraging me to do so nonetheless, with a playlist of songs that are “uniquely popular” in New Jersey.

I would like to know more about how this information is determined (how much more popular are these songs in NJ than they are in other states?), but this might be expecting too much. The bottom line is that I still think this effort by Spotify hit the correct tone and timing.

{ 1 comment }

Thanks for coming by to visit JamieSanford.com. If you enjoyed reading this post, please follow @JamieSanford on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS Feed or subscribe via email so you'll always be updated of my latest posts! Just enter your email address below and click the Subscribe button.

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I’m back with a packaging review! It’s been a while, but since I had never ordered from Colourpop before, it seemed like a good time to get back into these posts.

I ordered a palette when they had a sale, and it arrived within a few days. Let’s take a look.

Customized with the sticker, but it doesn’t appear to be a custom envelope.

Here’s a look at the back, and also at the bubble-wrapped package contents.

Out of the bubble wrap, we have a little Colourpop catalog/brochure, the packing list, and the palette in its outer box.

Here’s the inside of the brochure and a shot of the very cute note that was also included.

Spoiler alert – this is my favorite thing in this blog post. They label the palette with release dating! Every company should do this!

The front of the All I See is Magic palette. Unfortunately, you can see that some shadow has escaped the palette and smudged on the outer cover of the palette.

Sadly, this is a bit worse on the inside of the palette. There are issues on some of the individual shadows as well. I don’t know if this is because the palette wasn’t padded enough in shipping, or if the formula of the eyeshadows is such that they are fragile and that this is to be expected, no matter the padding for shipment.

This is the back of the palette. This is the thing that bothers me the most. I can accept that there is a cost savings in not printing eyeshadow names on the inside of the palette. These names are on the back of the palette, but the issue is that it is confusing when you have to flip it over to get the names, because if the shade name is behind where it actually lives in the palette is probably not the name?(The color descriptions on the website do clear this up.)

This could be improved in a few ways:

  • If possible, make it work so that the color names can be printed on the inside of the palette
  • Use photos of the actual shades on the sticker on the back to ID colors, to avoid the confusion of the layout
  • Put this sticker on the inside of the palette! These palettes don’t often have mirrors, so the sticker could just be placed there for ease in seeing the shadow names

The back of the palette box has the same information as on the sticker on the back of the actual palette. This all could be a little bit better. Again, I know that Colourpop is known for being budget-friendly for great quality, but I would still prefer that they identify issues like this and work it out so that the experience of their brand is just that much better.

I think Colourpop is a really interesting brand, and they appear to be growing like crazy, so I’m hopeful that they can address issues like these while still being able to maintain the tenets of their brand that has brought them to their current place in the market.

{ 0 comments }

Thanks for coming by to visit JamieSanford.com. If you enjoyed reading this post, please follow @JamieSanford on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS Feed or subscribe via email so you'll always be updated of my latest posts! Just enter your email address below and click the Subscribe button.

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

It’s a great time to be a lover of all things makeup. Makeup brands have exploded in growth in recent years, and inevitably, new brands are also coming out at a regular clip. A recent launch was that of Laura Lee Los Angeles, a brand by makeup YouTuber Laura Lee.

I am not a watcher of Laura Lee. I know about her but I don’t watch her channel. I started hearing some things about her initial launch and I went to check it out. Naturally, I can’t look at an e-commerce site without some kind of issue, but I haven’t run into a content issue like this before.

Let’s take a look.

I don’t understand this. This content is a mess of grammatical and spelling errors. (I heard after taking this screenshot that it was actually worse before I got to it. I do know that the original name was Cats Pajama’s, which is grammatically painful.)

Let’s go through this point by point.

  • I don’t like that the product name has a break. I would manually add a break to put “eyeshadow palette” on the second line.
  • Bullet 1 is pretty terrible. It’s like a run-on sentence, but not. Why they didn’t use additional bullets like those used below? It should look like this.
    • 10 highly pigmented, pressed-powder eyeshadows
    • 5 matte shadows
    • 4 shimmer shadows
    • 1 semi-matte/satin shadow
  • Bullet 2. “Smoky” doesn’t have an E, but the whole bullet is problematic. This bullet should read something like this:
    • This palette is extremely versatile; create everything from a light everyday look to a dark, smoky eye
  • Bullet 3. (Which is no longer here on the live site.) Cruelty-free should be hyphenated, and I’m curious now to know if that underlined text was a link to their practices in production and packaging and how exactly they are defining the product as cruelty-free and vegan.
  • Bullet 4, another one that doesn’t flow in any normal way. Update:
    • The luxe palette, featuring the eyeshadows and a mirror, is proudly produced in the United States
  • Bullet 5, more extremely questionable grammar. This could be as simple as:
    • Perfect for use by everyone at every level of experience, from makeup beginners to professional artists
  • Bullet 6. Even the intro to the color list is strange. Here’s where you add the palette name again to boost SEO. “The Cat’s Pajamas palette features the following colors:” would be perfect.
  • Bullet 7. Inconsistent capitalization, and a general lack of clarity. I’m guessing that “domestic” means in the United States, because the palette is produced there. However, is my shipping free if I am in Alaska or Hawaii, or is shipping only free in the contiguous United States?
    • Free ground shipping on orders over $100 shipping in the contiguous United States. Click here for complete information on shipping destinations, prices, and options. (In which the “click here” text would open a pop-up or a new tab or window to a complete shipping information page.

I have said at least a few times before that I believe in the power of editors and copywriters. The impression that a brand gives with terrible grammar and punctuation is very detrimental to my opinion, and I am certain that I’m not the only person who responds to this sort of thing.

This palette is sold out, so perhaps the power of Laura Lee is enough to overcome bad grammar, at least for her followers. I will not be buying anything to go near my eyes from a company that cannot get it together in the copywriting department. This lack of attention to detail is incredibly disappointing, particularly for a brand that is just launching.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

{ 0 comments }

Thanks for coming by to visit JamieSanford.com. If you enjoyed reading this post, please follow @JamieSanford on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS Feed or subscribe via email so you'll always be updated of my latest posts! Just enter your email address below and click the Subscribe button.

Sephora Play Box Packaging | Brand Experience Project

by Jamie Sanford on October 4, 2017

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

It’s been some time since I’ve reviewed order packaging, which was previously a symptom of not having ordered from new retailers. However, I recently signed up to receive the Sephora Play Box, and the packaging is so excellent that I felt compelled to share it.

Sephora¬†packaging is mostly great to begin with, but they have taken advantage of the opportunity to create something that will be the same size every month, so it is highly customized. Let’s take a look.

Customized and striking!

OK, this is what REALLY sold me. The tape on the box is custom tape, so that you can barely see it. This wasn’t necessary but is AMAZING. I can’t tell you how happy this tape makes me as someone who is highly invested in commerce.

They are clearly committed to the black, white, and red color palette for the outer packaging. You receive this card to get 50 extra points if you go into the store, and the backing folds open to give you details on each product in the bag!

Not only is this super cute, but this is an item in the box that you can use again. (The premise of the box is that you receive a number of deluxe beauty product samples each month.)

Little touches like an extra mention of the Play URL are not necessary, but create a pop of color in the bottom of the box, and are informative. When this box is being reprinted, I would like to see something here prompting the customer to leave a review of the box online, including a URL of where to do that.

Here are the samples included in this month’s box. I was impressed by the size of the liquid lipstick and the brow gel. These will actually last a while, and I think that the box might be well worth the price.

However, for this inaugural box in my subscription, the packaging is what really made my day. Congratulations to Sephora for recognizing the value in impressive, customized packaging.

Save

Save

{ 0 comments }

Thanks for coming by to visit JamieSanford.com. If you enjoyed reading this post, please follow @JamieSanford on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS Feed or subscribe via email so you'll always be updated of my latest posts! Just enter your email address below and click the Subscribe button.

Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

Today’s email topic is one that I’ve wanted to talk about for some time, and a recent email that I received from Peter Thomas Roth was the perfect jumping off point.

Let’s take a look:

It is a nice message, apologizing for website issues, and offering a special free gift with any purchase to make amends.

Here’s where I get into the email marketing conspiracy theory. Did the website really have issues? I have received enough of these emails that I don’t necessarily think that these are real issues every time.

I absolutely understand the struggle of increasing engagement with promotional emails, with seeing your emails getting lost in inboxes, never to be opened or clicked on. In response to the current online environment of people (unfortunately) looking to pounce on anything that someone has done “wrong,” perhaps the open rates on emails admitting fault are impressive and worth the potential risk of someone thinking you should not have had an issue in the first place.

I see a few different scenarios in which people open this email:

  • “Ooh, what did they screw up?” (see above)
  • “Ooh, they’re sorry about something, will I get something out of it?”
  • A genuine responder who had an issue related to the content of the email
  • The rare individual who opens all emails from a specific company

Is the “sorry” email a sad development in the evolution of email marketing? I’d love to know what you think. Let’s chat on Twitter.

Save

Save

Save

{ 0 comments }

Thanks for coming by to visit JamieSanford.com. If you enjoyed reading this post, please follow @JamieSanford on Twitter, subscribe to the RSS Feed or subscribe via email so you'll always be updated of my latest posts! Just enter your email address below and click the Subscribe button.