Email

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I’ve been very into emails for Brand Experience posts lately. Mostly, I managed to review the shopping and purchase experience of many of my go-to online stores, and I’m not currently interested in making purchases of things that I don’t need right now, so I will hold off on the full experience reviews until I try a new retailer.

In the meantime, I received another incredibly transparent email from a retailer that was unexpected and impressive, this time from eShakti. You can read a previous post about eShakti here.

Read the email and keep scrolling for my thoughts:

I could not get over this email when I received it. The majority of companies would quietly raise the prices and hope that it would just go by without issue. eShakti is even in the position of having a rotational offering of items, and so they could have absolutely gotten away with saying nothing. However, their CEO sends an email laying out the issues that face their business, and lets you know exactly what they are doing in order to keep their business in business.

I can attest to the shipping delays mentioned in this email, and after this email was sent, I found myself being more than mildly annoyed that not only was my item delayed, but I didn’t receive any sort of update on the timing.

However, this post is meant to highlight this email in particular, and I don’t want to take too much away from what I think is a great example of honest and straightforward communication with customers.

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Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

Today, I’m sharing a surprising email that I received from Universal Standard, a clothing company that has achieved more notoriety in recent time. They offer clothing in sizes 10-28, and the items are meant to be high-quality basics, in the best possible way.

From their website:

Polina Veksler and Alexandra Waldman started Universal Standard because size had become the dividing line determining who had the privilege and freedom to dress with quality and style.

That had to change, so they changed it.

Starting with the premise that clothes should look and feel good, they created a line of modern essentials, with a chic, downtown but classic aesthetic – giving women a new standard in style and experience.

The email they sent was dedicated to an explanation of their pricing and how it compares to pricing for similarly created items. Check it out below.

This is new and interesting! As someone who doesn’t buy tops that cost $200, it’s interesting to see this breakdown. The question that popped up for me immediately is to ask where these items are made. I checked on the website and didn’t find anything about where the items are made, which is a bit frustrating.

However, I don’t think I have ever seen such transparency in an email, and I opened it immediately. I have been on Universal Standard’s email list for a while and I am sure I will buy something from them eventually, and this email only helps me toward making a purchase.

Tweet me and let me know if you would be affected by an email of this nature!

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Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I have written a previous blog post about an Mpix email, where I wasn’t happy about a tracking number that wasn’t linked.

I am happy to be back with a positive review of the typical “you put something in your cart, please come back and buy it” email. However, the content of this email is what made me think it was worthy of a blog post.

Instead of a basic message of “there’s something in your cart,” this is a reiteration of Mpix’s message of quality process and product. While the message is undoubtedly a sales pitch, it is delivered in such a way that I don’t mind the effort to convince me to finish my purchase. A short and sweet description of why Mpix is great, their fast service and quality products.

I haven’t yet finished my purchase but will undoubtedly do so.

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Click here for all posts in the Brand Experience Project.

I just made up (I think) the word “edu-promotional” for this email from Photojojo, that is just too good. Take a look:

Why do I love this email?

  1. There’s no indication about buying the specific product until WAY down in the email, after the helpful content. There is a mention of a lens in step 8, but it isn’t even linked!
  2. Said content is actually useful.
  3. Said content is also humorous and fun.
  4. The button text is great, and not typical.
  5. The DISCLAIMER on the photo at the bottom, because someone is going to say something about it, so why not address it up front in a cute way.

Thumbs up to Photojojo for this email, it’s a winner!

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Another quick Brand Experience Project post today, after an unfortunate experience with a brand that is new to me.

During the Olympics, I became enamored with Sarah Robles, a badass weightlifter from the US, who won a bronze medal!  As is standard procedure now, I searched for her and started following her on Instagram. I was even more excited when I saw that she had a brand partnership with 360 Stretch Denim by Svoboda. (Total props to Svoboda for this. 1, Sarah is an amazing example of a plus-size woman killing it, and 2, having her lift in the jeans to show their stretch power is genius.) I couldn’t remember having heard of the brand, but I made a note to check them out, since I am fairly obsessed with finding the perfect pair of jeans.

I went on their website and was sold on the shape and the dark wash. The website was standard, so I won’t review that, but the shipping experience is where I start to have issues.

My order is shipped! This is great.

It starts to go downhill when 6 days later, the tracking link tells me that USPS hasn’t received the item yet, and I expected it to have been delivered.

More upsetting is that no one writes me back until September 2 – after I send another email, and then post a comment on one of their Instagram photos asking for someone to get back to me.

“I got this series of emails now. They were in junk. Sorry.” This is not the tone I would expect after having to reach out to a company multiple times about where my items are in the shipping process. You’ll note also that while the first email indicates that I will receive an update in an hour, I do not receive said email until the following day. An update email with a message of “My apologies again for the delay, I am now waiting to hear back from USPS and will get back to you as soon as I hear from them” would be preferable.

The second email is much friendlier. I appreciated the second shipment, but was surprised that Jessica didn’t indicate to me that the shipment had been upgraded to priority, which meant that I received my jeans in 2 days.

In addition to this unfortunate correspondence, I went back to Instagram to get a screenshot of my question, only to find that my question has been deleted.

This is the image I commented on. It isn’t there anymore, because it was deleted. My question was pretty innocuous, so I am baffled as to why they deleted it, instead of taking the opportunity to show how quickly and well they could respond to a customer issue.

In my work for Noritake, we have only ever deleted one Facebook comment, and that’s because it was HIGHLY offensive and inappropriate. I am a strong believer in addressing customer issues publicly – not only because it is vital to answer customer complaints, but it creates a public record of service. In addition, if I was irritated enough about a deletion, I would probably feel compelled to post MORE about my experience, creating a bigger issue. This is a miss by the Svoboda social team.

Tweet me with your thoughts on companies that delete customer questions!

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